Reflections On The History Of The Abyssinian Orthodox Tehwado Church

by Semere Tesfamicael Habtemariam
Reflections On The History Of The Abyssinian Orthodox Tehwado Church
  • ISBN-13: 9781569025680
  • Author(s): Semere Tesfamicael Habtemariam
  • Subject: African studies
  • Publisher: Africa World Press
  • Imprint: Africa World Press
  • Publication Date: 30-04-2017
  • Format: p/b

Availability: In stock

£31.99
This book tries to understand how Abyssinia (most of Modern-day Eritrea and Ethiopia) was favored by the three Abrahamic religions: Judaism, Christianity and Islam, and how the Orthodox Tewahdo Church has evolved to be the source of glory and quintessential identity of the people and country. The Orthodox Tewahdo Church is the oldest and most venerated institution in Abyssinia where the simple piety of the people has remained untouched throughout its long history. It is not only a religious institution but a repository of art, music, culture, poetry, and literature which has an immense influence on the very essence of Habesha identity. It is a 'carrier of high culture' (Gebre-Medhin, 1989). To some degree, understanding the Tewahdo Church is similar to understanding the last 17 centuries of Abyssinian history and civilization. It is the unveiling of 'this distinctive conglomerate and its forms and expressions' that 'had long become the store-house of the cultural, political, and socia
About the book

This book tries to understand how Abyssinia (most of Modern-day Eritrea and Ethiopia) was favored by the three Abrahamic religions: Judaism, Christianity and Islam, and how the Orthodox Tewahdo Church has evolved to be the source of glory and quintessential identity of the people and country. The Orthodox Tewahdo Church is the oldest and most venerated institution in Abyssinia where the simple piety of the people has remained untouched throughout its long history. It is not only a religious institution but a repository of art, music, culture, poetry, and literature which has an immense influence on the very essence of Habesha identity. It is a 'carrier of high culture' (Gebre-Medhin, 1989). To some degree, understanding the Tewahdo Church is similar to understanding the last 17 centuries of Abyssinian history and civilization. It is the unveiling of 'this distinctive conglomerate and its forms and expressions' that 'had long become the store-house of the cultural, political, and socia